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Science & Technology » Environment Share

Super-sizing nature havens would add people to valued species list

Super-sizing nature havens would add people to valued species list
Bordering the Chitwan Natural Park Nepal is a buffer zone which allows local residents some access to the forest to harvest wood and grasses.

New Delhi, Jan 31 (UNI) A group of scientists are recommending giving the world's nature reserves a makeover to protect not only flora and fauna, but people, too.
Scientists in this week's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences argue that the world's protected areas such as nature reserves, traditionally havens for endangered animals and plants, can be made better if they ratchet up benefits that directly benefit people.
The world's nature reserves not only defend nature for nature's sake, but also can curb erosion, prevent sandstorms, retain water and prevent flooding and sequester carbon.
The authors include more of a place for people - judiciously.
"Decades of interdisciplinary research teaches us that the best, most durable protections we can give nature are ones that also directly benefit people," said Michigan State University's Jianguo "Jack" Liu, a sustainability scholar long known for science of coupled human and natural systems.
"This new look at China's expansive nature reserves is an exciting way to understand how protected areas all over the world can be improved for both people and nature.
" Liu joins Weihua Xu of the State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology in the Chinese Academy of Sciences, as well as scientists from several other institutions in China as well as Stanford University and University of Minnesota, to evaluate what and how China's expansive protected areas are protecting, and envision a kind of new national park system that nurtures both man and beast.
Globally some 209,000 protected areas cover approximately 12 million square miles - more than 15 per cent of the world's land surface and 3 point 4 per cent of the ocean area.
Those areas can be a hot bed of human benefit - they are places that also are treasured for hunting, fishing, recreation and to marvel at natural beauty.
The group evaluates how good a job China's protected areas are doing at protecting biodiversity.
Overall, the reserve networks, which focus mainly on protecting valued mammals, do "reasonably well" for mammals and birds - mostly because they're designed with them in mind.
Plants, amphibians and reptiles aren't the target group for most reserves, and thus aren't as well protected.
Likewise, China's nature reserve network wasn't designed with the four key ecosystem services on which the study focuses in mind.
Water retention, soil retention, sandstorm prevention and carbon sequestration aren't on the map - literally.
The scientists see an opportunity to change borders and create new national parks to balance protection with sustainable use of natural resources.
The group envisions clusters of nature reserves, which would foster connectivity.
These new parks could permit human activity that wasn't disruptive to conservation efforts.
The win-win approach could garner more local and national support for protected areas, as well as make the super-sized parks more effective and durable.
"Many benefits generated in China's nature reserves, such as carbon sequestration, are telecoupled with the rest of the world.
UNI YSG JW ADG 1043

Dengue

Dengue epidemic should be declared as 'Health disaster" in TN : DMK

Chennai, Oct 20 (UNI) The Opposition DMK in Tamil Nadu today demanded that the outbreak of dengue epidemic in the state, which has claimed nearly 40 lives, should be declared as a 'Health disaster'.

Panacea

Panacea Biotec receives Manufacturing Authorisation for 22 medicinal products

Mumbai, Oct 17 (UNI)Panacea Biotec a leading biotechnology company said that it has received the Certificate of GMP Compliance from State Service of Ukraine on Medicines and Drugs Control with Manufacturing Authorization for 22 medicinal products, including 4 oncology products for a period valid till June 24, 2020.

UN

UN launches plan to stop transmission of bovine TB to humans

United Nations, Oct 13 (UNI) Stressing the damaging impact on poor rural communities in Africa and South-East Asia of animal tuberculosis’ (bovine TB) transmission to humans, United Nations health experts have launched the first-ever roadmap to combat the so-called zoonotic TB.

World

World will have more obese children and adolescents than underweight by 2022: WHO

Kolkata, Oct 12 (UNI) The number of obese children and adolescents (aged five to 19 years) worldwide has risen tenfold in the past four decades.

Int'l

Int'l breast cancer conference stresses on need for early diagnosis, awareness

New Delhi, Oct 7 (UNI) To promote awareness about breast cancer which is becoming the common cancer among women in the country, an international conference was inaugurated on Saturday.

Solar eclipse 2017: North America will witness total solar eclipse

Solar eclipse 2017: North America will witness total solar eclipse

New York, Aug 21 (UNI) Today, all of North America will witness a total solar eclipse for the first time in 99 years, where the Moon will pass in front of the Sun, casting darkness across swathes of the Earth's surface - with up to 14 states shrouded in complete blackout.

Nano-particle fertilizer could lead to new 'green revolution'

Nano-particle fertilizer could lead to new 'green revolution'

New Delhi, Jan 26 (UNI) Sri Lankan scientists report having developed a simple way to make a benign, more efficient fertilizer – described as nano-particle fertilizer - that could contribute to a second food revolution across the globe.

Broken pebbles offer clues to Palaeolithic funeral rituals

Broken pebbles offer clues to Palaeolithic funeral rituals

New Delhi, Feb 9 (UNI) Humans may have ritualistically "killed" objects to remove their symbolic power, some 5,000 years earlier than previously thought, a new international study of marine pebble tools from an Upper Palaeolithic burial site in Italy suggests.

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