Thursday, Jun 27 2019 | Time 08:23 Hrs(IST)
image
  • Actress-Director Vijaya Nirmala Passes away
  • Putin, Trump to meet in Osaka on Friday - reports
  • Egypt qualify for AFCON knockouts after 2-0 win over DR Congo
  • US watchdog requests documents on Trump’s Saudi nuclear deal
  • US fails to provide protection, services to ensure wellbeing of migrant children - UNICEF
  • Venezuelan authorities capture participants of latest coup attempt - Maduro
  • New bidding process has no negative impact on Olympics, says Bach
  • At least 15 people killed, 75 injured in stampede at Madagascar stadium - Reports
  • IOC membership expands to 105 as 10 new members elected
  • Trump says he will have 'Very Good Conversation' with Putin at G20 summit in Osaka
  • Trump rules out possibility of meeting DPRK's Kim during Asia trip
  • PM leaves for Japan to attend G 20 Summit
  • Pakistan beat New Zealand by six wickets
  • Pakistan beat New Zealand by six wickets
  • Pakistan beat New Zealand by six wickets
Features


Some Japanese pensioners want to go to jail!

Some Japanese pensioners want to go to jail!

Tokyo, Jan 31 (UNI) Japan is in the grip of an elderly crime wave -- the proportion of crimes committed by people over the age of 65 has been steadily increasing for 20 years.

The BBC's Ed Butler asks why.

At a halfway house in Hiroshima -- for criminals who are being released from jail back into the community -- 69-year-old Toshio Takata tells me he broke the law because he was poor. He wanted somewhere to live free of charge, even if it was behind bars.

"I reached pension age and then I ran out of money. So it occurred to me - perhaps I could live for free if I lived in jail," he says.

"So I took a bicycle and rode it to the police station and told the guy there: 'Look, I took this.'"

The plan worked. This was Toshio's first offence, committed when he was 62, but Japanese courts treat petty theft seriously, so it was enough to get him a one-year sentence.

Small, slender, and with a tendency to giggle, Toshio looks nothing like a habitual criminal, much less someone who'd threaten women with knives. But after he was released from his first sentence, that's exactly what he did.

"I went to a park and just threatened them. I wasn't intending to do any harm. I just showed the knife to them hoping one of them would call the police. One did."

Altogether, Toshio has spent half of the last eight years in jail.

I ask him if he likes being in prison, and he points out an additional financial upside - his pension continues to be paid even while he's inside.

"It's not that I like it but I can stay there for free," he says. "And when I get out I have saved some money. So it is not that painful."

Toshio represents a striking trend in Japanese crime. In a remarkably law-abiding society, a rapidly growing proportion of crimes is carried about by over-65s. In 1997 this age group accounted for about one in 20 convictions but 20 years later the figure had grown to more than one in five -- a rate that far outstrips the growth of the over-65s as a proportion of the population (though they now make up more than a quarter of the total).

And like Toshio, many of these elderly lawbreakers are repeat offenders. Of the 2,500 over-65s convicted in 2016, more than a third had more than five previous convictions.

Another example is Keiko (not her real name). Seventy years old, small, and neatly presented, she also tells me that it was poverty that was her undoing.

"I couldn't get along with my husband. I had nowhere to live and no place to stay. So it became my only choice: to steal," she says. "Even women in their 80s who can't properly walk are committing crime. It's because they can't find food, money."

We spoke some months ago in an ex-offender's hostel. I've been told she's since been re-arrested, and is now serving another jail-term for shoplifting.

UNi XC-SNU 1215

More News
UN fund helps thousands of sex abuse survivors rebuild their lives

UN fund helps thousands of sex abuse survivors rebuild their lives

22 Jun 2019 | 2:59 PM

United Nations, Jun 22 (UNI) The UN Trust Fund, in support of victims of sexual exploitation and abuse, has supported women in the Democratic Republic of the Congo receive vocational trainings like mushroom farming.

see more..
First-ever WHO global report on epilepsy

First-ever WHO global report on epilepsy

21 Jun 2019 | 12:23 PM

United Nations, Jun 21 (UNI) More than seven in 10 people with epilepsy in developing countries are not getting the low-cost care they need, and UN health experts have said this could lead to a “significantly higher” risk of death among sufferers than in industrialized nations.

see more..
Low trust in vaccines global crisis

Low trust in vaccines global crisis

19 Jun 2019 | 2:36 PM

London, Jun 19 (UNI) Public mistrust of vaccines means the world is taking a step backwards in the fight against deadly yet preventable infectious diseases, warn experts.

see more..
169 countries facing danger of desertification

169 countries facing danger of desertification

17 Jun 2019 | 7:11 PM

By Ajeet Jha
New Delhi, Jun 17 (UNI) With increasing urbanisation and increase in cultivated land, 169 countries across the world , including India, are facing the prospect of desertification.

see more..
Most 'meat' in 2040 will not come from slaughtered animals

Most 'meat' in 2040 will not come from slaughtered animals

17 Jun 2019 | 2:07 PM

Sydney, Jun 17 (UNI) Most of the meat people eat in 2040 will not come from slaughtered animals, according to a report that predicts 60pc will be either grown in vats or replaced by plant-based products that look and taste like meat.

see more..
image