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Donated blood in Kashmir not safe for transfusion: DAK

Donated blood in Kashmir not safe for transfusion: DAK

Srinagar, Jun 13 (UNI) Doctors Association Kashmir (DAK) today said that donated blood in Kashmir was not safe for transfusion as Kashmir continued to use traditional methods thus jeopardising the safety of patients through blood transfusion when several states in India have adopted NAT to screen blood.
“Although blood transfusion is life-saving, but unsafe blood transfusion is life-threatening”, said DAK president Dr Nisar ul Hassan in a statement on the World Blood Donor Day here.
Outmoded screening tests being done on donated blood banks in the Valley put patients at risk of life-threatening infections, he said.
He said blood banks screen blood and blood products for Hepatitis B, C and HIV viruses by conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test that does not detect very early stages of infection in donated blood.
These viruses have a “window period” of weeks to months during which the virus does not show up in the conventional test.
During this period, any donated blood will transmit the infection to the recipient.
He said according to various studies one in every 500 units of blood collected from a donor can easily be missed by ELISA test even if it is infected.
In order to ensure safe blood, many countries have switched from ElISA to Nucleic Acid Test (NAT) technology for screening of donated blood.
Dr Hassan said NAT detects viruses even in the window period and its introduction has eliminated the transmission of deadly viruses by blood transfusion.
While several states in India have adopted NAT to screen blood, blood banks in Kashmir continue to use traditional methods thus jeopardizing the safety of blood.
The infected blood is responsible for colossal hepatitis epidemic in the valley.
Out of 90 hemophiliac patients screened, 45 patients were positive for Hepatitis C, 4 for Hepatitis B and one was positive for HIV.
The DAK president said that these hemophiliac patients have contracted this deadly virus because of contaminated fresh frozen plasma (FFP), a blood product which they receive on demand during bleeding.
According to a study, 38 per cent of the population of two twin villages of Takia-Magam and Sonbarie were found to be infected with Hepatitis C virus.
During a screening in 2015, 84 persons were found positive for Hepatitis B virus in village Diver of Lolab area.
There are around 459 cases of HIV infection registered in SKIMS hospital.
UNI BAS RSA SNU 1633

Ultrasonography:New

Ultrasonography:New and larger scope

Kolkata, Sep 20 (UNI) Can ultrasonography be used for peripheral nerve blocks? A Kolkata-based private specialty hospital recently organised a one-day workshop on "Ultrasound Guided Regional Anaesthesia" to familiarise budding anaesthesiologists and practitioners with the use of ultrasound and how to perform the various procedures.

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3 die of swine flu in Jabalpur, toll rises to 19

Jabalpur, MP, Sep 20 (UNI) After three more people – including two women – succumbed to the HINI virus in the past 24 hours, the death toll due to swine flu has risen to 19 in this cantonment town.

History

History of modern transfusion medicine

Kolkata, Sep 15 (UNI) The Medical Officer Incharge (MOIC) Blood Bank, Fortis Hospitals, Anandapur here, Dr Avijit Dev today said in ancient literature, there are descriptions of blood oozing and death of suffering humanity owing to that everybody gets a panic whenever sees a person bleeding profusely in front of him.

Lupin

Lupin receives FDA approval for generic Flagyl® Tablets

Mumbai, Sep 13 (UNI) Pharma Major Lupin announced that it has received final approval for its Metronidazole Tablets USP, 250 mg and 500 mg from the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market a generic version of G.

Glaucoma

Glaucoma is vision thief, Cataract is sight killer: Experts

By Rishira Jain New Delhi, Sep 11 (UNI) Health experts from various eye institutes have blamed Cataract and Glaucoma for around 70 per cent of all eye-related diseases in the country, leading to either temporary or permanent blindness.

Ultrasonography:New and larger scope

Ultrasonography:New and larger scope

Kolkata, Sep 20 (UNI) Can ultrasonography be used for peripheral nerve blocks? A Kolkata-based private specialty hospital recently organised a one-day workshop on "Ultrasound Guided Regional Anaesthesia" to familiarise budding anaesthesiologists and practitioners with the use of ultrasound and how to perform the various procedures.

Solar eclipse 2017: North America will witness total solar eclipse

Solar eclipse 2017: North America will witness total solar eclipse

New York, Aug 21 (UNI) Today, all of North America will witness a total solar eclipse for the first time in 99 years, where the Moon will pass in front of the Sun, casting darkness across swathes of the Earth's surface - with up to 14 states shrouded in complete blackout.

Nano-particle fertilizer could lead to new 'green revolution'

Nano-particle fertilizer could lead to new 'green revolution'

New Delhi, Jan 26 (UNI) Sri Lankan scientists report having developed a simple way to make a benign, more efficient fertilizer – described as nano-particle fertilizer - that could contribute to a second food revolution across the globe.

Broken pebbles offer clues to Palaeolithic funeral rituals

Broken pebbles offer clues to Palaeolithic funeral rituals

New Delhi, Feb 9 (UNI) Humans may have ritualistically "killed" objects to remove their symbolic power, some 5,000 years earlier than previously thought, a new international study of marine pebble tools from an Upper Palaeolithic burial site in Italy suggests.

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