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Science & Technology Share

Doctors remove patient's brain tumour while he was awake

Doctors remove patient's brain tumour while he was awake
Dr Pramod Giri, Professor and head of neurosurgery department, GMCH, Nagpur

Nagpur, Apr 10 (UNI) Achieving a new milestone, the doctors at Super Specialty Hospital (SSH) attached to the Government Medical College and Hospital (GMCH) here, successfully removed the brain tumor while the patient remained awake and observed his surgery.
In medical terms, it is called as an awake craniotomy and is first of its kind in the known medical history the district.
The entire procedure was performed in one and half hours,while the patient was awake and talking to the anaesthetists and neurosurgeon.
He was earlier counseled to react to the instructions like seeing, talking, moving limbs etc during the surgery.
The name of the patient was Vijay Nanwatkar (40), hailing from Bhandara district.
Dr Pramod Giri, Professor and head of neurosurgery department told mediapersons hetre that the tumour was pressing over many important areas of the brain, thalamus and the brainstem and Wermickes.
Hence instead of performing the surgery in general anaesthesia where the surgeon would not know the effect of the surgery while operating we decided to conduct awake craniotomy, so that we could save all the basic functions of the body.
"It was the only solution for best results," he said.
Dr Vali said that the awake craniotomy decreases the cost of drugs heavily as no general anaesthesia drugs, which are very expensive, are used.
It also puts the patient back on the feet immediately after the operation.
Dr Lokendra Singh, senior neurosurgeon and director, Dr M Taori Central India Institute of Medical Sciences (CIIMS) who has done quite a few awake craniotomy said, it is heartening to see that awake craniotomy was being done in government set up.
The team of anaesthetists led by Dr Vali included Dr Rajesh Nagmote, Dr Abhay Ganar, Dr Ketki Ramteke, Dr Neha Gedam and Dr Neha Shahane.
UNI PK NV PS SHK 1600

Environmental

Environmental health risks especially affect women and children

Kolkata, Nov 20 (UNI) Environmental health risks especially affect women
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exposures to environmental contaminants create greater risks for children’s developing bodies and cognitive functions.

Hydrogen

Hydrogen can become great tool against climate change

New Delhi, Nov 19 (UNI) Greater use of hydrogen for energy can considerably reduce CO2 emissions compared to today’s levels, says a study.

Cipla

Cipla Receives Final Approval for Generic Pulmicort Respules

Mumbai, Nov 17(UNI) Pharma major, Cipla Ltd, today said that it
has received final approval for its Abbreviated New Drug Application
(ANDA) for Budesonide Inhalation Suspension, 0.

Antibiotic

Antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest threats to global health

Kolkata, Nov 14 (UNI) Antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest threats to global health, food security and development today.

Drop

Drop in cases of plague in Madagascar: WHO

Geneva, Nov 4 (UNI) While progress has been made in response to the plague outbreak in Madagascar, and the number of suspected new cases continues to decline, the World Health Organisation (WHO) has said that sustaining operations through the remainder of the plague season would be critical as there was still a risk of potential further spread of the disease.

Solar eclipse 2017: North America will witness total solar eclipse

Solar eclipse 2017: North America will witness total solar eclipse

New York, Aug 21 (UNI) Today, all of North America will witness a total solar eclipse for the first time in 99 years, where the Moon will pass in front of the Sun, casting darkness across swathes of the Earth's surface - with up to 14 states shrouded in complete blackout.

Nano-particle fertilizer could lead to new 'green revolution'

Nano-particle fertilizer could lead to new 'green revolution'

New Delhi, Jan 26 (UNI) Sri Lankan scientists report having developed a simple way to make a benign, more efficient fertilizer – described as nano-particle fertilizer - that could contribute to a second food revolution across the globe.

Broken pebbles offer clues to Palaeolithic funeral rituals

Broken pebbles offer clues to Palaeolithic funeral rituals

New Delhi, Feb 9 (UNI) Humans may have ritualistically "killed" objects to remove their symbolic power, some 5,000 years earlier than previously thought, a new international study of marine pebble tools from an Upper Palaeolithic burial site in Italy suggests.

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