Wednesday, Sep 18 2019 | Time 10:51 Hrs(IST)
image
  • New Zealand PM welcomes Facebook's action against extremism
  • Amit Shah to flag off 'Johar Jan Ashirwad Yatra' in Jharkhand
  • Israeli Blue and White Bloc head says ready to 'speak with everyone' about Gov't formation
  • Trade pact headway may offer both US and India - a win-win situation
  • People deserve to know the truth about what happened to Netaji after air crash at Taihoku : Mamata
  • Israeli PM's challenger calls for unity gov't
  • Riyadh to present evidence of Iran's involvement in attacks on oil facilities on Wednesday
  • Trump to meet Imran
  • Pakistan condemns attack of Saudi's oil facility
  • Two more cases of Polio reported in Pakistan
  • All eyes on Mamata-Modi meet in capital on Wednesday
  • French experts to help Saudi Arabia investigate attacks on oil facilities
  • Low Pressure area likely to form in next 12 hrs under influence of cyclonic circulation : IMD
  • Ramanathan-Gengel move into doubles second round in Glassgow
  • Ramanathan-Gengel move into doubles second round in Glassgow
World


Brexit: Scottish judges rule Parliament suspension is unlawful

Brexit: Scottish judges rule Parliament suspension is unlawful

London, Sep 11 (UNI) Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s suspension of the UK Parliament is unlawful, Scotland’s highest civil court has ruled.

A BBC News report said on Wednesday that a panel of three judges at the Court of Session found in favour of a cross-party group of politicians who were challenging the prime minister's move.

The judges said the PM was attempting to prevent Parliament holding the government to account ahead of Brexit.

The UK government said it will appeal against the ruling to the Supreme Court in London.

The Court of Session decision overturns an earlier ruling from the court, which said last week that Mr Johnson had not broken the law.

But it is currently unclear what impact the judgement will have on the current suspension of Parliament - a process known as proroguing - which started in the early hours of Tuesday.

MPs are not scheduled to return to Parliament until 14 October, when there will be a Queen's Speech outlining Mr Johnson's legislative plans. The UK is due to leave the EU on 31 October.

Mr Johnson has previously insisted that it was normal practice for a new government to prorogue Parliament, and that it was "nonsense" to suggest he was attempting to undermine democracy.

But the Court of Session judges said they were unanimous in their belief that Mr Johnson was motivated by the "improper purpose of stymieing Parliament", and that he had therefore misled the Queen.

They added: "The Court will accordingly make an Order declaring that the prime minister's advice to HM the Queen and the prorogation which followed thereon was unlawful and is thus null and of no effect."

The group of more than 70 largely pro-Remain MPs and peers behind the legal challenge were headed by SNP MP Joanna Cherry, who called for Parliament to be immediately reconvened following the ruling.

She added: "We feel utterly vindicated and I would be confident that the UK Supreme Court will uphold this decision."

The parliamentarians appealed to the Inner House of the Court of Session after their original challenge to the suspension of Parliament was dismissed by judge Lord Doherty last week.

Lord Doherty said Mr Johnson had not broken the law by proroguing Parliament, and that it was for MPs and the electorate to judge the prime minister's actions rather than the courts.

But the three Inner House judges said they disagreed with Lord Doherty's ruling because this particular prorogation had been a "tactic to frustrate Parliament" rather than a legitimate use of the power.

One of the three judges, Lord Brodie, said: "This was an egregious case of a clear failure to comply with generally accepted standards of behaviour of public authorities.

"It was to be inferred that the principal reasons for the prorogation were to prevent or impede Parliament holding the executive to account and legislating with regard to Brexit, and to allow the executive to pursue a policy of a no-deal Brexit without further Parliamentary interference."

And Lord Drummond Young said that the UK government had failed to show a valid reason for the prorogation, adding: "The circumstances, particularly the length of the prorogation, showed that the purpose was to prevent such scrutiny.

"The only inference that could be drawn was that the UK government and the prime minister wished to restrict Parliament."

A spokesman for Number 10 said it was "disappointed" by the decision, and would appeal to the Supreme Court.

He added: "The UK government needs to bring forward a strong domestic legislative agenda. Proroguing Parliament is the legal and necessary way of delivering this."

Scotland's first minister, Nicola Sturgeon, said the ruling was of "enormous constitutional significance", and that Parliament should be recalled immediately to allow it to do the "real and substantive work of scrutiny".

She added: "The prime minister's behaviour has been outrageous and reckless, and has shown a complete disregard for constitutional rules and norms."

Labour's Shadow Brexit secretary Sir Keir Starmer said Parliament should be recalled as early as this afternoon.

He told the BBC: "Most people didn't believe Boris Johnson, but for the courts to find he has unlawfully shut down Parliament and that his motive wasn't the one he said it was? That's very powerful.

"I call on him to recall Parliament. Let's get it back open, and sitting this afternoon and tomorrow, so we can debate what happens next and we can debate this judgement."

It emerged during last week's hearings that Mr Johnson appeared to have approved a plan to shut down Parliament two weeks before publicly announcing it.

The court heard the prime minister was sent a note on 15 August asking if he wanted to prorogue parliament from mid-September. A tick and the word "yes" were written on the document. He announced the plan on 28 August.

The court later agreed to release the documents to the media.

In a separate case brought by anti-Brexit campaigner Gina Miller, the High Court in London also ruled last week that Mr Johnson had acted lawfully. Ms Miller is appealing that decision in the Supreme Court.

Meanwhile, a hearing at the High Court in Belfast into the implications of a no-deal exit is continuing, with a campaigner for victims of the Troubles arguing that it could jeopardise the Northern Ireland peace process.

UNi SNU 1645

More News
Pakistan condemns attack of Saudi's oil facility

Pakistan condemns attack of Saudi's oil facility

18 Sep 2019 | 10:29 AM

Islamabad, Sep 18 (UNI) Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan has called Saudi Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman to strongly condemn the drone attack in the gulf country's oil facility.

see more..
Trump to speak on religious freedom at UN

Trump to speak on religious freedom at UN

18 Sep 2019 | 8:59 AM

Washington, Sep 18 (UNI) US President Donald Trump will address an event on religious freedom at the United Nations next week, the White House said on Tuesday.

see more..

Two more cases of Polio reported in Pakistan

18 Sep 2019 | 8:54 AM

Islamabad, Sep 18 (UNI) Two more polio cases have been reported in Pakistan, taking the total to 64, a media report said on Wednesday.

see more..

Hailing B'desh's growth, NZ HICOM proposes to improve business climate with NZ aid

17 Sep 2019 | 10:45 PM

Dhaka, Sep 17 (UNI) Non-resident High Commissioner of New Zealand to Bangladesh Joanna Mary Kempkers while citing example of her country as the top ranked one among 190 economies in the Ease of doing business expressed desire to share its experience with Bangladesh in order to attract more investments to the young developing country.

see more..
At least 22 killed, 38 wounded in Kabul suicide attack

At least 22 killed, 38 wounded in Kabul suicide attack

17 Sep 2019 | 9:14 PM

Kabul, Sep 17 (UNI) At least 22 people, including six military personnel, were killed and 38 others injured in an explosion carried out by a suicide bomber near Massoud Square on Tuesday, police said.

see more..
image