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Science & Technology Share

25-mn unsafe abortions occur each year: UN health agency

25-mn unsafe abortions occur each year: UN health agency

United Nations, Sept (UNI) About 25 million unsafe abortions, accounting for 45 per cent of all abortions, occurred every year from 2010 to 2014 worldwide, with 97 per cent of those unsafe procedures occurring in developing countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America, a new United Nations study has found.
“Increased efforts report are needed, especially in developing regions, to ensure access to contraception and safe abortion,” says Bela Ganatra, a scientist and the lead author of the study, The Lancet, released today by the World Health Organisation (WHO) and the Guttmacher Institute, according to a press release by the UN News Centre here.
“Despite recent advances in technology and evidence, too many unsafe abortions still occur, and too many women continue to suffer and die,” added Ms.
Ganatra of WHO's Department of Reproductive Health and Research.
For the first time, the study includes sub-classifications within the unsafe abortion category as less safe or least safe.
The distinction allows for a more nuanced understanding of the different circumstances of abortions among women who are unable to access safe abortions from a trained provider.
The risk of severe complications or death is negligible if procedures follow WHO guidelines and standards.
About 55 per cent of all abortions from 2010 to 2014 were conducted safely.
Some 31 per cent of abortions were “less safe,” meaning they were either performed by a trained provider using an unsafe or outdated method such as “sharp curettage,” or by an untrained person using a safe method like misoprostol, a drug that can induce an abortion.
About 14 per cent were “least safe” abortions provided by untrained persons using dangerous methods, such as introduction of foreign objects and use of herbal concoctions.
Complications from “least-safe” abortions can include a failure to remove all of the pregnancy tissue from the uterus, haemorrhage, vaginal, cervical and uterine injury, and infections.
The study also found that in countries where abortion is completely banned or permitted only to save the woman's life or preserve her physical health, only one in four abortions were safe; whereas, in countries where abortion is legal on broader grounds, nearly 9 in 10 abortions were done safely.
Restricting access to abortions does not reduce the number of abortions.
Most abortions that take place in Western and Northern Europe and North America are safe.
These regions also have some of the lowest abortion rates.
The proportion of abortions that were safe in Eastern Asia, including China, was similar to developed regions.
In South-Central Asia, however, less than one in two abortions were safe.
In Latin America, only one in four abortions were safe.
Less than one in four abortions in Africa, excluding Southern Africa, were safe.
UNI XC-SNU 0928

Environmental

Environmental health risks especially affect women and children

Kolkata, Nov 20 (UNI) Environmental health risks especially affect women
and children, because they are more vulnerable socially and because
exposures to environmental contaminants create greater risks for children’s developing bodies and cognitive functions.

Hydrogen

Hydrogen can become great tool against climate change

New Delhi, Nov 19 (UNI) Greater use of hydrogen for energy can considerably reduce CO2 emissions compared to today’s levels, says a study.

Cipla

Cipla Receives Final Approval for Generic Pulmicort Respules

Mumbai, Nov 17(UNI) Pharma major, Cipla Ltd, today said that it
has received final approval for its Abbreviated New Drug Application
(ANDA) for Budesonide Inhalation Suspension, 0.

Antibiotic

Antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest threats to global health

Kolkata, Nov 14 (UNI) Antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest threats to global health, food security and development today.

Drop

Drop in cases of plague in Madagascar: WHO

Geneva, Nov 4 (UNI) While progress has been made in response to the plague outbreak in Madagascar, and the number of suspected new cases continues to decline, the World Health Organisation (WHO) has said that sustaining operations through the remainder of the plague season would be critical as there was still a risk of potential further spread of the disease.

Solar eclipse 2017: North America will witness total solar eclipse

Solar eclipse 2017: North America will witness total solar eclipse

New York, Aug 21 (UNI) Today, all of North America will witness a total solar eclipse for the first time in 99 years, where the Moon will pass in front of the Sun, casting darkness across swathes of the Earth's surface - with up to 14 states shrouded in complete blackout.

Nano-particle fertilizer could lead to new 'green revolution'

Nano-particle fertilizer could lead to new 'green revolution'

New Delhi, Jan 26 (UNI) Sri Lankan scientists report having developed a simple way to make a benign, more efficient fertilizer – described as nano-particle fertilizer - that could contribute to a second food revolution across the globe.

Broken pebbles offer clues to Palaeolithic funeral rituals

Broken pebbles offer clues to Palaeolithic funeral rituals

New Delhi, Feb 9 (UNI) Humans may have ritualistically "killed" objects to remove their symbolic power, some 5,000 years earlier than previously thought, a new international study of marine pebble tools from an Upper Palaeolithic burial site in Italy suggests.

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