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'Gone are the Days': Vignettes of nostalgia

'Gone are the Days':  Vignettes of nostalgia

By Jaison Wilson


New Delhi, Oct 1 (UNI) Some stories put new life into memories and some become memories, but every story speaks about the chain of events linked with it. Indo-Canadian writer Gaurav Sharma asserts that he loved creating memories for readers through his debut novel 'Gone are the Days'.


In an interview with UNI, the 25-year-old Gaurav spoke about his experiences as a writer, life and dreams. The book recounts Gaurav’s struggle to discover his ambitions, make pals, maintain a good friendship, to keep 'crazy people' out of his reach and to adapt to the harsh realities of his life.


The novel, a 180-page semi-autobiography, is the story of Gaurav's journey from Bihar to Canada via Delhi. Inspired by real-life happenings, it has some fictional essence. The book is a story of a middle-class boy who experiences many kaleidoscopic shifts in life due to the perfect mismatching scenarios destiny offers him. 'Gone are the Days' takes the readers into a world where they can truly relate their daily-life scenario with the protagonist.


His introvert nature in the book (and to some extent in real life, he says) is something that sets Gaurav apart from the mass. "Half of the problems and complications occur in the book because of my weird and raw thought process. The 'protagonist', at times, forgets that chaos is the law of nature and keeps on perfecting things in his life." he said.


About the journey as an author, Gaurav said, " Though I had started writing at a very early age, it was in 2011 after admission in the bachelor degree programme in journalism that I realised I had a flair for it." At the age of 19, he penned a textbook ‘Design & Graphics Redefined’ and so far has authored four books.


Gaurav described his experience as a novelist. " I learned that fiction writing is more difficult than writing a textbook. I realised that everybody has a story to tell. Besides, the most surprising thing I learned after publishing the book was that most of the people in your life don’t care at all about you. As long as you are serving their purpose, they will be with you (superficially). The moment you start providing them with constructive but uncomfortable feedback, they will seek for someone else. Everyone is willing to take; hardly there is anybody who wishes to give back."


The young writer has a vision about his life as it is a progression."As they say in Hindi ‘Chalti ka naam zindagi.’ Anybody who is just sitting (even on the right track) will be run over (by the train) at some point in life. I believe anybody can live for themselves and there should be no pride in that life. The day you help someone, do something that can make others believe in hope is the day you lived. However, one should not always go beyond their capacity and ability to help others as it can put them in trouble."


About his new venture, Gaurav said it was a period fiction, set in 18th century Pataliputra, which highlights the impact of Kaliyuga. Its proposed title is 'God of the Sullied.'


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